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ISSUE 5

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Editorial

After an artistic practice is exposed as research, it is easy to believe that it has always been research, regardless of its exposition. Conversely, if a case has not been made for something to count as research, a doubt on its epistemic relevance will linger over it. While a different attempt at an exposition may yield different results, we are tempted to see the research in the thing itself and not also in its exposition. This conjecture is problematic.Click here to Read More

Abstract
Can different forms of dialogue influence the way we learn and think? This was the question that Amber Yared and Heather Davis set out to explore. Drawing upon examples from radical education, we were interested in how dialogic form changes the way we approach a topic and the different kinds of knowledge that it might produce. To experiment with this question, we engaged with three different forms of dialogue: interview, conversation, and metalogue – a style of dialogue where the form mirrors the content – which we engaged performatively in various forums.
http://doi.org/10.22501/jar.57214

Art and Research Colliding Teemu Mäki

Abstract
This exposition concerns the relationship between art and research. It focuses on the questions: How can we define knowledge and research in the context of artistic research? What is artistic research? What is its goal? How is it different from other traditions of combining art and research? How should the university system react to and make use of artistic research? What is artistic knowledge and how is it used? How can we justify art as a special, flexible form of research? ...
http://doi.org/10.22501/jar.49919

Abstract
The Invisible Inside the Visible was a personal quest turned art project to locate physical evidence of a century-old racetrack on the Cape John peninsula in the village of River John, Nova Scotia. The journey to find the racetrack was marked by its double invisibility. Not only was it remembered without specificity in regard to location, it was also invisible to the observing eye because it was embedded into the landscape...
http://doi.org/10.22501/jar.31415

Alpha Juliet MacDonald

Abstract
This is a report of an art-research project that started over four years ago. It concerns drawings made by a chimpanzee as part of a scientific experiment conducted in the 1940s. On the first page I summarise the background to my project, the discussion of drawing that provides a context, and the areas of enquiry that are exposed. On three further pages of the exposition I discuss the methods by which I conducted the research. 'Collecting' describes the acquisition of second-hand books dating from the first half of the twentieth century...
http://doi.org/10.22501/jar.49782

Abstract
This exposition considers movement intervention in architectural spaces as a form of artistic practice and potential research methodology. Examples of movement intervention within architecture in contemporary artworks are examined, helping to describe the parameters of this technique...
http://doi.org/10.22501/jar.27285

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